Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2010

Percy-in-Peril!

Percy-in-Peril!

My lovely friend CC has just sent me a link to the following website…

Her late father was the man responsible for finding ‘Percy the plesiosaur’ and the urgent need for funds to preserve this important relic are clearly pressing…

It’s a fascinating story – anyone that’s interested in reading more or helping in any way, please visit the Percy In Peril Appeal website!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

42. . .

This week I went to see 80s funk legends Level 42 in concert… I really only went because my friend Sean Freeman is the sax player with the group and kindly got both myself and a mate a ticket to go see the gig and visit them backstage. . . but I have to say it was fantastic evening!

A really packed venue (sell out crowd in fact!), some clearly die-hard fans, and a great performance by the band (all really technical players in own right), plus an excellent support slot from Yolande Charles, all resulted in a really fun evening. . .

Here are few terrible pictures (taken from my mobile so apologies for poor quality!)

Level 42 in concert in St Albans

Level 42 in concert in St Albans

Backstage pass!

Backstage pass!

Rock and roll baby, rock and roll. . .

Read Full Post »

Following the success of my steampunk flag (and in particular the way the copper-coloured anemometer at the very top worked in the wind), I have been becoming a bit obsessed with these twirling devices!

The flag anemometer in action

The flag anemometer in action

I now find myself looking out for other anemometers, and in no time at all have spotted two such devices, both of very different designs and locations. . .

Firstly though, here is the original one from my flag – a four bladed version made from halved ping pong balls, some stout wire and an old electric motor for the freely-rotating spindle. Mine simply turns in the breeze for a bit of fun / decoration – the electric motor is not connected to anything, does not generate a charge or serve to run any instrumentation (although the next version might!?):

my one

my one

I was amazed to find this old photo of one of the earliest anemometers, and how incredibly similar the cups are to mine (even the slight distortion where the wire goes through the cups)

A hemispherical cup anemometer of the type invented in 1846 by John Thomas Romney Robinson

A hemispherical cup anemometer of the type invented in 1846 by John Thomas Romney Robinson

The second example is from the top of a boat mast (moored in Torquay harbour) – I am guessing it serves to measure the wind speed, whilst all the other doodads and doohickeys are for cunning things such as radar etc…

Boat anemometer

Boat anemometer

And finally, here is one that sits astride a lamppost on the business park where I work a few days…I’ve no clue why a business park needs to monitor wind speed – any ideas??

Lamp post anemometer

Lamp post anemometer

I am now obsessed with finding more such devices – if any of you out there spot any, please send me photos / details and I’ll post them up…

Here is a Wiki page on anemometers >>, and here is my video of the flag anemometer in action >>

Read Full Post »

Further to the snippet shown in this previous post, my old mucker Gerald Roberts has just let me know that there are more, fuller length videos now up on the wibbly wobbly web re his participation in the Fault Line Living project…

Here are the details:

The Fault Line Living Crew, sponsored by the Royal Geographical Society and Land Rover, are making a series of documentaries about people who live on or close to earthquake faults. As part of this, Dr. Gerald Roberts of the Institute of Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR at UCL/Birkbeck), has made some videos visiting the epicentral area of the 2009 M6.3 L’Aquila Earthquake in central Italy. Dr. Roberts tries to define the role of “earthquake geology”, a new discipline in earthquake science, and attempts to show how this discipline can help seismology in earthquake forecasting.

Viewers can comment on the videos at the following website to document what they learned from the videos.

Enjoy!!

Read Full Post »

Cultural Arts Travelogue feature

Cultural Arts Travelogue feature

Present at the recent Cakes gig in the St Albans Town Hall (see here for more details) was the multi-talented Preethi Janice D’Sa, author of The Cultural Arts Travelogue blog. Not only did she take a video of us (which will be posted on her site soon – will keep you informed of this), but she also wrote a very nice review and article about us – read it here >>

I met up with Jan to have a general chin wag about all things bloggy, creative, living the life of an life as an entrepreneur and consultancy business and, in particular, living in Dubai (a place I have visited a couple of times and have a particular fascination with)… It was great to find such a like-minded person, and am sure we will have some cross-collaboration on things in the future.

Janice says of her blog:
The Cultural Arts Travelogue (the CAT) is the blog website brought to you by Preethi Janice D’Sa, Content strategy consultant, writer, designer and traveller.  It is our mission through the blog part of the website to bring you interesting news that celebrates the global handcrafted culture of artists and artistes. This is achieved through Jan’s intense involvement in the art and arts scene both in the UAE and wherever she travels.

As part of our service offerings, we help companies attract and retain their clients by developing effective, engaging and relevant content across various platforms through innovative content/editorial strategies in keeping with the brand identity.

Read Full Post »